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Purchasing the Perfect Sunglasses

Sunglasses Hendersonville, TN

Summer has arrived, and your eyes will need protection from the fierce sun. It’s time to buy sunglasses, but you might wonder which pair is best for you. Different people have different sunglasses needs, and Judd Family Eyecare would like to help you find the ones that will work best for you.

 

UV Protection

UV, or ultraviolet, rays are one of the biggest summer worries for people with vision issues. Just as they can burn your skin, UV rays damage your eyes and burn the skin around them. Since your eyes are so sensitive, you’ll need a pair of sunglasses with strong protection.

Make sure the glasses you’re considering protect against UVA and UVB rays. Note that although darker lenses can offer more protection, a dark lens alone is not your best defense against eye damage. Ask your eyeglasses provider about the strongest protective lenses available. Additionally, ask how much UV exposure your particular area gets per year.

 

Glare

Everyone loves a warm, sunny day, but the sun’s glare is a real problem. It can disrupt your work or make relaxing outside quite unpleasant. Find the best glare protection possible, especially if your summer will involve plenty of driving or other vision-intensive activities.

Polarized lenses and antireflective coatings are your best bets, especially if you like to read or do other close work in the sun. This type of protection keeps you from getting eyestrain, headaches, and fatigue. Have antireflective coating applied to the front and back of your lenses. This will reduce frontal glare and reduce glare when the sun is to your side or behind you.

 

Lens Tint

Again, the idea that darker lenses equal more protective sunglasses is a myth. Lens tint is your choice, but you should choose based on the activities you do in the sun, not just personal preference. For example, you might love those dark purple lenses, but if you live in a coastal location, you might want dark brown ones instead. This is because coastal locations, or any area with frequent bright sunlight, have a great deal of reflective light.

If you’ll spend most of your summer outdoors, consider sunglasses with photochromic lenses, those that darken immediately when you go outside. Mirrored lenses, which block 10-15% of the sun’s rays, are also a good consideration.

 

A Final Word

Ask your eye doctor for a sunglasses recommendation if you aren’t sure where to begin. If you already wear glasses or contacts, you will need a prescription; your doctor may also suggest fit-over clips.